Canada’s first Sensor Tour!

After a very successful launch in Calgary, SensorUp’s Smart Citizens for Smart Cities will be expanding via a Canada-wide tour!

The Smart Citizens for Smart Communities Tour will recruit partners in 10 Canadian municipalities, 3 in northern regions. With our partners, we’ll recruit 500 volunteers, to adopt 500 devices with 3 sensors each. Each volunteer will get to track their own data, and the data from all devices will combine in municipal air quality maps, and a country-wide air quality map.

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Canada-wide Tour

We will recruit partners in 10 Canadian municipalities, 3 in northern regions.

Volunteers and Devices

We’ll recruit 500 volunteers, to adopt 500 devices.

Sensors

The sensors measure PM 2.5, relative humidity, and temperature.

Calgary

We recruited 50 volunteers throughout the Calgary.

Learn More

So… what is this all about?

Smart Cities Offer Better Services More Efficiently

Smart cities take advantage of the falling cost of sensor hardware to connect everyday objects to the internet. Connected objects can be monitored, and can “talk” to each other. A smart city uses the data to provide essential services more effectively and provide better services.

View Our Roadmap

Traffic systems can be streamlined to make traffic flow more efficiently.Water systems can be monitored to plan maintenance and avoid major breakdowns.
Traffic systems can be streamlined to make traffic flow more efficiently.Traffic systems can be streamlined to make traffic flow more efficiently.
Public transit can be tracked, so riders always know where the next bus is, even if there's a delay.Public transit can be tracked, so riders always know where the next bus is, even if there’s a delay.
Air quality can be monitored to alert the public, especially those with respiratory issues, of dangerous times or areas.Air quality can be monitored to alert the public, especially those with respiratory issues, of dangerous times or areas.

What we did in Calgary

We recruited 50 volunteers throughout the city. Everyone came to a workshop, where we assembled the devices, connecting 3 sensors, and making sure everything worked properly! Then, we connected all the devices to the network via wifi. After that, volunteers took their sensors home, and connected them to their home wifi. Over the weekend we got 50 air quality devices running in Calgary!

A city-wide Internet of Things “starter kit”

Calgary’s city-wide Internet of Things “starter kit” feeds all these sensor readings into a single browser-based map of air quality in the region. The air quality map is made available to everyone online, so all our volunteers’ sensor readings contribute to public knowledge, and a city-wide Smart Cities demonstration project.

Visit the Air Quality in Calgary site

Screen Shot of Air Quality in Calgary site

What are we measuring?

Each device houses 3 sensors. The sensors measure PM 2.5, relative humidity, and temperature.

PM 2.5

For air quality, we measure particulate matter 2.5, normally known as PM 2.5. This is one of the most important measures of air quality.

Humidity

Relative humidity is the amount of moisture in the air compared to what the air can “hold” at that temperature. We measure relative humidity because it can affects PM 2.5.

Temperature

We measure relative temperature because they can affects PM 2.5.

Air Quality is Important

The air we breathe affects our health, and the health of our environment. For a healthy population, it’s important to have healthy air. One of the most important measures of air quality is PM 2.5. PM 2.5 is a size of particle in the air. It is measured in concentration, that is, the amount of it in the air.

Visit the Air Quality in Calgary site

PM 2.5 particles travel farther because they’re smaller: smaller particles don’t settle down as quickly, and as a result, they are retained in the air for longer. Thus, they’re carried by the wind to travel longer distances. This means they affect a larger region around the emission source. On top of that, our respiratory system has a harder time filtering out these small particles, making it more likely that unhealthy substances will get into our lungs and bodies.

Dr. Ke Du Air Quality Expert, University of Calgary

Thank you, volunteers!

Fifty (50!) volunteers throughout Calgary have each “adopted” an air quality sensor, plugged it in outside their home or office, and connected it to our smart cities platform.

So… What’s next?

Our Roadmap

roadmaproadmap

What happens Next?

Now, GeoConnections Canada is supporting SensorUp so that we can tour Canada with the Smart Citizens for Smart Communities project. We’ll visit 10 municipalities, recruiting both partners and volunteers, to deploy 500 more sensors all over the country!

In each municipality, partners will sign up for workshop tickets. They’ll give these out to volunteers in their area. Then, volunteers will assemble and connect devices at the workshop. Then they’ll take their device home and connect it there. As each person does that, devices will be deployed throughout the municipality.

The devices combine their datastreams to produce a public resource of air quality measurements, as well as maps, visualizations, comparisons, etc. of the data. As measurements come in from all over the municipality, every 5 minutes we’ll be building a public database, with unprecedented geographic and temporal coverage.

Volunteers and partners will get full access to data, visualizations, and mapping, on websites provided by SensorUp. They’ll also get full access to the raw data and API. (SensorUp provides a complete suite of online support tools to get you started with the API.)

Sign Up for workshop tickets

Sign Up

Come to the workshop

Workshop

Upload the data

Cloud Storage

analyze the data

Data Analysis

What our partners get

Partners get to be on the front lines of deploying sensors throughout their municipality. They recruit, select, and work with volunteers, who are a group of engaged, techy, and community-minded citizens.

Our partners also get access to SensorUp’s experts in smart cities and IoT. Finally, they demonstrate their support for community, advanced technology, and smart cities. Engagement Partners also communicate their support through logo placement on the numerous websites that comprise the program.

What happens at the workshop:

SensorUp supplies all the parts needed to assemble your device. We also supply IoT and Smart Cities experts to walk you through assembly and network (wifi) connection. We’ll explain everything you need to know about the hardware,network, and software, and help you whenever needed.

You’ll go home with a completely assembled device, and knowing exactly how to connect to your home wifi. You’ll get a take-home guide that walks you through the process. You’ll also know our team, and have our contact information, so you can talk to us any time you have a question about your device or the program.

When you volunteer, you get:

As a volunteer, you get a ticket to the workshop, where you’ll also get access to world-leading experts in IoT and smart cities. Our experts will help our volunteers assemble their devices, check them, and then connect them to the network.

Volunteers also get ongoing access to our expert team for troubleshooting and support. Best of all, volunteers get to be part of a Canada-wide, citizen-led smart cities initiative, which will produce a valuable public resource of air quality data.

Volunteers will learn through hands-on experience about smart cities, IoT, and the cutting-edge technology that makes it all possible.

air quality sensor

An air quality sensor and setup instructions

Connection to the smart cities platform

Connection to the smart cities platform

To contribute to city-wide knowledge about air quality

To contribute to country-wide knowledge about air quality

The happy feeling of making our city smarter

The happy feeling of making our country smarter

(We’ll never display or disclose your home location, and your location is not stored in the database.)

Requirements:

(1) Good sensor location:





(2) Willingness to engage with the technology




Ongoing sensor maintenance

Once your sensor is plugged in at home, and connected to your wifi, you can just leave it. The sensor should deal with any power outages or wifi interruptions by reconnecting itself. If something does happen, normally all you need to do is power cycle the device. That means, unplug and then plug back in. It takes about 10 seconds. If you change your wifi provider, network name, or password, or if power cycling doesn’t work, you’ll simply need to go through the reconnection steps again. Don’t worry, we’ll provide you with a take-home guide that walks you through the process. The whole process takes a couple minutes.